Counseling Services

Changes to Health and Wellness Center: Fall Semester 2020

The Health and Wellness Center is open but all staff are working remotely.*
All phone/video consultations for Counseling must be scheduled.

To schedule your Counseling Initial Consultation:
Log into the Lake Forest Student Health Portal
 
There will be same-day crisis appointments for Counseling Services, however, you will need to schedule a same day appointment.

Call 847–735-5240 (please leave message) or
email healthandwellness@mx.lakeforest.edu
 
Health and Wellness Services Hours*: 
Monday - Friday
8:30 am - Noon
1 pm - 5 pm
*By Appointment Only
 
Mental Health Emergencies
(outside of normal business hours M–F 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.)

Crisis Counselor on Call:
224-501-1621

Outreach Services:

All following services are available to all Lake Forest College students, regardless of geographic location: 

  • Online Support Spaces
  • Digital Workshops – stress management, time management, test anxiety, etc
  • Educational posts and videos on social media
  • Instagram: lfchealthandwellness
  • Facebook: Lake Forest College Health and Wellness Center
  • Twitter: lfcbewell
  • Social media is the easiest way for them to find out what workshops we’re offering that week – If you feel comfortable, please encourage your students to follow us.

Clinical Services:

For students residing in the state of Illinois during Fall 2020: 

  • Counseling Services offers telemental health counseling via telephone or face-to-face video conferencing to currently enrolled Lake Forest College students who meet the eligibility criteria for remote counseling services.

  • Prior to beginning telemental health counseling, a student will have an initial phone consultation with a HWC Counseling Services staff member in order to verify their identity, location, and eligibility for telemental health. For those who do not meet the eligibility, the HWC staff member will provide resources and referrals in their community

  • Services for students who reside in Illinois:
  • Individual therapy
  • Couples therapy
  • Group therapy
  • Crisis Intervention
  • On-call emergency consultation
  • Outreach & consultation

For students residing outside of the state of Illinois during Fall 2020: 
We are not currently able to offer on-going telemental health counseling because of limitations set forth by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation. 

Students who live outside of the state but who would like assistance finding a therapist near them are still encouraged to contact us for assistance with the referral process.

Crisis Management:

All students can schedule same-day crisis sessions with a therapist by contacting the Health and Wellness Center at 847-735-5240

After business hours, all students can access our Crisis Counselor On-Call crisis phone at 224-501-1621. This phone is for crises only and not a way of calling to schedule an appointment

Have you read The Stentor yet?

We have!  Click on the link below to read an article in The Stentor clearing up any misconceptions you may be having about who is eligible for our services and how to attain them.  Then, keep reading to find all the articles that are more fun than ours!

https://stentornews.com/an-update-from-the-health-and-wellness-center-2/  

Mental Health and Coping During COVID-19

Mental Health and Coping During COVID-19 | CDC

Stress and Coping

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may be stressful for people. Fear and anxiety about a disease can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in adults and children. Coping with stress will make you, the people you care about, and your community stronger.

Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations.  How you respond to the outbreak can depend on your background, the things that make you different from other people, and  the community you live in.

People who may respond more strongly to the stress of a crisis include

  • Older people and people with chronic diseases who are at higher risk for COVID-19
  • Children and teens
  • People who are helping with the response to COVID-19, like doctors and other health care providers, or first responders
  • People who have mental health conditions including problems with substance use

If you, or someone you care about, are feeling overwhelmed with emotions like sadness, depression, or anxiety, or feel like you want to harm yourself or others call

  • 911
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA’s) Disaster Distress Helpline: 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746. (TTY 1-800-846-8517)

Stress during an infectious disease outbreak can include

  • Fear and worry about your own health and the health of your loved ones
  • Changes in sleep or eating patterns
  • Difficulty sleeping or concentrating
  • Worsening of chronic health problems
  • Increased use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs

People with preexisting mental health conditions should continue with their treatment and be aware of new or worsening symptoms. Additional information can be found at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSAexternal icon) website.

Taking care of yourself, your friends, and your family can help you cope with stress. Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.

Things you can do to support yourself

  • Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body. Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced meals, exercise regularly, get plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind. Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others. Talk with people you trust about your concerns and how you are feeling.

Call your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row.

Reduce stress in yourself and others

Sharing the facts about COVID-19 and understanding the actual risk to yourself and people you care about can make an outbreak less stressful.

When you share accurate information about COVID-19 you can help make people feel less stressed and allow you to connect with them.

Learn more about taking care of your emotional health.

For Parents

Children and teens react, in part, on what they see from the adults around them. When parents and caregivers deal with the COVID-19 calmly and confidently, they can provide the best support for their children. Parents can be more reassuring to others around them, especially children, if they are better prepared.

Not all children and teens respond to stress in the same way. Some common changes to watch for include

  • Excessive crying or irritation in younger children
  • Returning to behaviors they have outgrown (for example, toileting accidents or bedwetting)
  • Excessive worry or sadness
  • Unhealthy eating or sleeping habits
  • Irritability and “acting out” behaviors in teens
  • Poor school performance or avoiding school
  • Difficulty with attention and concentration
  • Avoidance of activities enjoyed in the past
  • Unexplained headaches or body pain
  • Use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs

There are many things you can do to support your child

  • Take time to talk with your child or teen about the COVID-19 outbreak. Answer questions and share facts about COVID-19 in a way that your child or teen can understand.
  • Reassure your child or teen that they are safe. Let them know it is ok if they feel upset. Share with them how you deal with your own stress so that they can learn how to cope from you.
  • Limit your family’s exposure to news coverage of the event, including social media. Children may misinterpret what they hear and can be frightened about something they do not understand.
  • Try to keep up with regular routines. If schools are closed, create a schedule for learning activities and relaxing or fun activities.
  • Be a role model.  Take breaks, get plenty of sleep, exercise, and eat well. Connect with your friends and family members.

Learn more about helping children cope.

For Responders

Responding to COVID-19 can take an emotional toll on you. There are things you can do to reduce secondary traumatic stress (STS) reactions:

  • Acknowledge that STS can impact anyone helping families after a traumatic event.
  • Learn the symptoms including physical (fatigue, illness) and mental (fear, withdrawal, guilt).
  • Allow time for you and your family to recover from responding to the pandemic.
  • Create a menu of personal self-care activities that you enjoy, such as spending time with friends and family, exercising, or reading a book.
  • Take a break from media coverage of COVID-19.
  • Ask for help if you feel overwhelmed or concerned that COVID-19 is affecting your ability to care for your family and patients as you did before the outbreak.

Learn more tips for taking care of yourself during emergency response.

For Those Released From Quarantine

Being separated from others if a healthcare provider thinks you may have been exposed to COVID-19 can be stressful, even if you do not get sick. Everyone feels differently after coming out of quarantine. Some feelings include :

  • Mixed emotions, including relief after quarantine
  • Fear and worry about your own health and the health of your loved ones
  • Stress from the experience of monitoring yourself or being monitored by others for signs and symptoms of COVID-19
  • Sadness, anger, or frustration because friends or loved ones have unfounded fears of contracting the disease from contact with you, even though you have been determined not to be contagious
  • Guilt about not being able to perform normal work or parenting duties during quarantine
  • Other emotional or mental health changes

We all experience times of change and transition in our lives. Sometimes this process is orderly and understandable. At other times it can be rapid, chaotic, and upsetting. Understanding, coping, and dealing with these times can be difficult.

When we need help we often turn to family and friends. Sometimes we need the assistance of a trained professional to work with people in the process of exploring and solving problems in their lives. We would like to welcome you to Counseling Services with the hope that our services will be helpful to you.

Have the student health insurance plan offered by the College?

Cigna has 24/7 CareConnect: 888-857-5462. CareConnect counselors will provide in-the-moment support and determine the most clinically-appropriate next step. This includes counseling, or referrals to the Health and Wellness Center, medical provider, or emergency services. 

Mission Statement

The Health and Wellness Center’s mental health professionals assist students in overcoming personal, emotional, and psychological issues that may negatively impact their ability to reach their academic goals and to make the most of their educational experience at Lake Forest College. We educate students about mental health and wellness issues and teach them about healthy lifestyle choices. We strive to assist students in acquiring the skills, attitudes, and resources necessary to both succeed in the college environment and pursue satisfying and productive lives.

A core component of our mission is the promotion and affirmation of our community diversity in its broadest sense. We recognize that a diverse community enriches our campus and enhances opportunities for human understanding, both of which contribute to the learning environment for all. The Health and Wellness Center has a strong commitment to meeting the needs of diverse people. In all clinical, assessment, training, psychiatric, program, and outreach services we strive to create an environment where all people feel welcome and respected. As a staff, we attempt to facilitate mutual respect and understanding among people of diverse racial, ethnic, and national backgrounds, gender, sexual/affectional orientations, mental and physical abilities, languages, classes, ages, religious/spiritual beliefs, socioeconomic background as well as other types of diversity. We strive to nurture environments where similarities and differences among people are recognized, respected, and honored.

Text-a-Tip 24/7

Text-a-Tip: 24/7 anonymous support for students who need help for themselves or a friend. Text “LAKECO” to 1-844-823-5323 to connect with a local fully licensed mental health professional.

Free Anonymous On-line Screening

FREE Anonymous Online Screening for:

  • depression
  • alcohol or substance abuse
  • bipolar disorder
  • eating disorders
  • generalized anxiety disorder
  • post-traumatic stress disorder
  • psychosis

The screening is provided by Mental Health America so that you may quickly and easily find out whether or not professional consultation would be helpful to you.

Text-a-Tip: 24/7 anonymous support for students who need help for themselves or a friend. Text “LAKECO” to 1-844-823-5323 to connect with a local fully licensed mental health professional.

Counseling Services is open…but working remotely

Leave a message at 847-735-5240 or email healthandwellness.edu and the department assistant will reach out as soon as possible.

Location

Buchanan Hall, Room 137
Health and Wellness Center
(South Campus)

Contact Us

Monday - Friday*
8:30 a.m. - Noon
1 p.m. - 5 p.m.
* By appointment only

Phone: 847-735-5240
Fax: 847-735-6098 
healthandwellness@mx.lakeforest.edu

Emergencies (outside of normal business hours)

Crisis Counselor on Call:
224-501-1621

Public Safety: 
847-735-5555

Did you know?

Over three billion people around the world live on $2 or less a day. Each spring students have the opportunity to participate in the Forgotten Majority Business Conference on campus.